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Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 07/16/2015 in all areas

  1. 6 points
    1 of 996

    jiggity76 comes through once again!

    My car has been missing this piece for as long as I and the guy before me have owned it. But today I got a "care package" in the mail from jiggity76 and inside was the moulding I have been missing and it is in WHITE. With about 20 minutes of my time disassembling and polishing, it's as close to NOS as a used piece is going to get. Now, a missing key piece to the car is in place.......
  2. 6 points
    ManicMechanic

    Cutlass convertible original drafts

    Gentleman named Paul bought a bunch of Oldsmobile drafting papers and these were among them.
  3. 5 points
    quakerj

    '96 Grand Prix Project - new member

    Hi folks, I joined this forum at the suggestion of a guy on another forum regarding a '96 Grand Prix SE (150k miles) that I'm trying to fix up. I bought this car for peanuts knowing it had a bad head gasket (or worse.) With a cold engine and radiator cap removed, coolant shoots out of the radiator whenever the starter is engaged or engine running. There's evidence of coolant boilover out of the coolant expansion tank, plus coolant in two or more cylinders (wet plugs). Also have coolant in oil (not a huge amount, but enough to tell it's there). Idiot previous owner wired up the radiator fan to run all the time instead of fixing what was probably a simple intake gasket, and proceeded to overheat the piss out of it. I'm pretty confident it's head gasket and not just the intake gasket. Oddly a compression test gives me 170 PSI on all cylinders. Pretty major power steering leak and a small section of rotting brake line that needs replaced round out the list of problems with this car. Shouldn't be all that difficult to make a good runner out of this, I've done head gaskets and fairly major repairs on other vehicles. I will probably make another post inquiring about options for repair-- I'd really like to consider an engine swap. This is purely a project car, can take my time and do it right. But for now, just wanted to introduce myself and add a couple pics of the car. Have always loved this body style GP, didn't give it a second thought when I saw this for sale, I had to have it!
  4. 5 points
    89-W-Body-Regal

    Vintage W-body photo thread - most pics fixed and lots of new pics

    Here is More Vintage W-body Photos that I been meaning to get myself to share
  5. 5 points
    Psych0matt

    3.1 Plugs and Wires

    I usually ask Manuel as well, but he doesn’t always answer right away
  6. 5 points
    oldmangrimes

    Front suspension fail

    She's back on the road! After a long winter of fighting rusty bolts, I finally got her back together yesterday. I carefully drove her around the block once, and she seemed to drive and shift fine. I haven't noticed any leaks from the transmission or the brake lines. I'll try a longer drive tonight after work and see how it goes. Parts replaced: Passenger side only: Axle. Both sides: Control arms, tie rods (inner and outer), ball joints, flex brake lines. Parts saved: Fender (I straightened the bent lip). Wheel well trim and lower cladding were slightly damaged but I reinstalled them. TBD: Passenger front tire and hub. The tire held air all winter, but I need to drive at higher speeds and go around corners to evaluate the hub and tire. Total cost: About $400 including tools. Time spent: I don't want to think about it, probably 50+ hours if you count watching videos and buying tools. It doesn't sound like much, but I found ways to make the project take forever. It was my first time doing any of these jobs on any car, so it was a slow learning curve to figure out what technique to use. I often would only have two or three hours a week to work on it, so it dragged on and on. I tried to save money by using the wrong tool for the job a few times, which just ended up with wasted time and frustration until I would give up and drive to the store and buy the right tool. Once I had the right tool and the right technique, each job wasn't bad. Moral of the story: Buy the right tool!
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