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MemphisMan

LQ1 3.4L DOHC V6 Timing Belt Change

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MemphisMan

Here's the link to the timing belt change I did on 11 January, 2020. 

 

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rich_e777

This is great, I got to see the red Cutlass up close and watching this tonight!

 

Ive read about how to change it out but I`m a visual sort of guy and this will help enormously for when I have to change mine out in a few years.

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digitaloutsider

I finally got around to checking this thread out. Thank you for making this video! We don't get all that much technical information anymore. Are you okay with me moving this to the FAQs?

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MemphisMan
17 hours ago, digitaloutsider said:

I finally got around to checking this thread out. Thank you for making this video! We don't get all that much technical information anymore. Are you okay with me moving this to the FAQs?

Yes, absolutely okay with it. Hopefully it'll help someone out. 

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55trucker

Well, one does if they intend on doing the job *by the book*.

There's nothing wrong in doing the job in this manner IF the engine is not a high mileage unit.

The timing chain does stretch, when it does that throws off the cam timing making it late. If one does not release the cam sprockets to *reset* them to the *new* position when rotating the crank for #1 top center & locking them down you will end up with the same late cam timing you started with.

 

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Psych0matt

I had never thought of that, but that’s probably exactly what happened with my cutlass when I had it. I did the timing belt first time by the marks and it was fine, but then after a top and swap and some other issues I could never get a time right by the marks, even though I know I had them lined up. It makes perfect sense though. One of these days I’m going to have to do the 92, I might have to save this video but hopefully it’s not for a few years

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bluecalais79

Thank you for posting this video. After looking at it I can now safely say I will never attempt this job on my own.

That's why these videos are so valuable. They not only provide a first hand practical look at how it's done, they also serve to give you a beforehand choice on whether or not you want to even attempt the task. I'm out.

Kudos to Memphis Man for freeing up the huge part of a day of my life for me.

 

Edited by bluecalais79

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jiggity76
17 hours ago, 55trucker said:

Well, one does if they intend on doing the job *by the book*.

There's nothing wrong in doing the job in this manner IF the engine is not a high mileage unit.

The timing chain does stretch, when it does that throws off the cam timing making it late. If one does not release the cam sprockets to *reset* them to the *new* position when rotating the crank for #1 top center & locking them down you will end up with the same late cam timing you started with.

 

What mileage is considered to be high mileage?  I have 153,000 on the International and 114,000 on the STE.  Should I be concerned about the timing chain yet?

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Psych0matt

I don’t think it’s as much of a concern if you’re not doing the timing belt. I think it’s more that things won’t line up as originally marked.

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55trucker

I would consider 150,000 miles (240,000 kilometers) a definite candidate for a timing chain. I've had LA1/LH0 engines apart that had 170,000 kilometers or so on them & the timing chain was stretched to the point where the cam timing was late by near 10 crank degrees. The LQ1 engine has a tensioner on the heel side of the chain so the chain won't necessarily be loose & rattle, when one manually moves the dampener back & forth one doesn't feel & see that customary *loose gap* that one will notice with the pushrod engines that do have a worn chain & the chain allows the crank to move for a few degrees without moving the cam.

*the LQ1 has an advantage that the pushrod engines do not....one can get away with the original timing chain (assuming it does not break later somewhere down the road) when doing the cam belt. If one does the cam timing *by the book* one resets the cam cog positions to the crank *straight up* centerline, even tho the chain may be stretched the cams will be in proper time with the crank.

Edited by 55trucker

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jiggity76

I have been thinking about pulling the motor and just doing all the appropriate maintenance repairs with the motor out, much easier to replace items at that point.  I mean, I have a brand new lift and engine stand just sitting in the corner from my 87 GMC Sierra project and I only used these items a few times for that project so they have been barely used.  It would be easy to do the chain and alternator as well.  I probably should do this with the STE when the time comes.  Whatever these LQ1's require for maintenance, they will get!  Thank you.

 

aY8JjW[1].jpg

6aM52e[2].jpg

20190622_074007[1].jpg

Edited by jiggity76

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MemphisMan
On 1/27/2020 at 5:20 PM, 55trucker said:

Well, one does if they intend on doing the job *by the book*.

There's nothing wrong in doing the job in this manner IF the engine is not a high mileage unit.

The timing chain does stretch, when it does that throws off the cam timing making it late. If one does not release the cam sprockets to *reset* them to the *new* position when rotating the crank for #1 top center & locking them down you will end up with the same late cam timing you started with.

 

I need help understanding this concept please. 

So lets just say, for shits and giggles, that the timing belt and all associated pulleys and components would NEVER wear out, but the timing chain would continue to stretch/wear normally. Are you saying that the cam timing would eventually be off because of that? I think I've talked myself into answering that question as a "yes". 

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MemphisMan
On 1/28/2020 at 8:50 AM, bluecalais79 said:

Thank you for posting this video. After looking at it I can now safely say I will never attempt this job on my own.

That's why these videos are so valuable. They not only provide a first hand practical look at how it's done, they also serve to give you a beforehand choice on whether or not you want to even attempt the task. I'm out.

Kudos to Memphis Man for freeing up the huge part of a day of my life for me.

 

There's a video on youtube that is really a shortened version of mine, but the same procedure. It's the video I used to do the job the first time, along with a lot of reading on here. What that video lacked, IMO, is all the little details. How to remove the steering pump, how to get to top dead center, how to "transfer the marks" to the new belt, how the hydraulic tensioner and pulley work together (because you assemble it by feel...can't see back there). It also shows how I struggled to do some things, which is normal. You don't need to be an expert to do this job. You just need to pay attention to the details. It's a long video, but the people who really want to attempt this will eventually end up watching every minute of it. I'm honestly glad it helped you decide not to attempt it. I think the video I watched originally didn't give me enough detail to make that decision so I went for it. Had you only watched that video, you might've gotten in over your head and nobody on here would want that for you.

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55trucker
1 hour ago, MemphisMan said:

I need help understanding this concept please. 

So lets just say, for shits and giggles, that the timing belt and all associated pulleys and components would NEVER wear out, but the timing chain would continue to stretch/wear normally. Are you saying that the cam timing would eventually be off because of that? I think I've talked myself into answering that question as a "yes". 

That's it in a nutshell, accurate cam timing is dependent on the condition of the timing chain, the chain will wear/stretch over time, the longer the engine (for example...original parts) has been in use the more wear the chain will see. It's possible for an extremely worn chain (under just the right circumstances) to jump a tooth on the crank gear.

The attached pic is an example of a well worn chain. Pull up the tension on one side & the opposite is extremely loose.

worn out timing chain.jpg

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tonytoca_87

You helped me out big time 2 years ago when i changed my belt and components on my 95 vert. Just want to say thanks again and also great video. Thumbs up my man. 😀👍🏼

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57lxi

Great video. Been anguishing over this job but video convinced me I can do it. Shop estimated $400 in labor to do it. I’m all over it now. Question. Would it not be a bit easier to route the belt over the back pulleys first? More room to fight it on the front pulleys.

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cessna

Great video on replacement, I went threw this same process last year and it was a challenge for sure but I did pull the belt towards the front after finding that  I couldn't get enough room for my hands to pull tension in the rear . I had no problem with the new tensioner on mine fitting the bracket but that is something to keep in mind for the next one if I encounter that problem ... Once again nice job  thought I would drop a few pics of my mess also ...oh by the way mine is a 1993 lumina z34 

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Edited by cessna

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jiggity76
33 minutes ago, cessna said:

Great video on replacement, I went threw this same process last year and it was a challenge for sure but I did pull the belt towards the front after finding that  I couldn't get enough room for my hands to pull tension in the rear . I had no problem with the new tensioner on mine fitting the bracket but that is something to keep in mind for the next one if I encounter that problem ... Once again nice job  thought I would drop a few pics of my mess also ...

IMG_0665.JPG

IMG_0666.JPG

IMG_0667.JPG

IMG_0668.JPG

IMG_0682.JPG

IMG_0663.JPG

Awesome pics!  Yes, the video MemphisMan did is helping a lot of us LQ1 guys out.  What car is this motor living in?  It looks like a 93 car.  Please post pics, would love to see it!

And, you have your original front red GM plug wires, so envious of that!

Edited by jiggity76

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cessna

I only change what is needed when needed , car still runs like new 92,000 miles on it had this baby since day one had 3 miles on it when i bought it I will have to dig up some pics to post for you 

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jiggity76
6 minutes ago, cessna said:

I only change what is needed when needed , car still runs like new 92,000 miles on it had this baby since day one had 3 miles on it when i bought it I will have to dig up some pics to post for you 

Your are the original owner, that's incredible!  I can't wait to see pics of it!  Please hurry.

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MemphisMan
On 1/31/2020 at 6:32 AM, 57lxi said:

Great video. Been anguishing over this job but video convinced me I can do it. Shop estimated $400 in labor to do it. I’m all over it now. Question. Would it not be a bit easier to route the belt over the back pulleys first? More room to fight it on the front pulleys.

Yes, I think it would be easier to route the belt over the back pulleys first, but I've always been schooled in leaving as much slack as possible where the actuator will engage. I don't remember the belt being that difficult to put on the cogs when I did the vert timing belt. If you do end up route over the back pulleys first, and it works, will you please update this thread? I'll be doing my 91 Cutlass Sedan soon and would like to try it for sure.  

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MemphisMan
1 hour ago, cessna said:

Great video on replacement, I went threw this same process last year and it was a challenge for sure but I did pull the belt towards the front after finding that  I couldn't get enough room for my hands to pull tension in the rear . I had no problem with the new tensioner on mine fitting the bracket but that is something to keep in mind for the next one if I encounter that problem ... Once again nice job  thought I would drop a few pics of my mess also ...oh by the way mine is a 1993 lumina z34 

Glad to know that starting on the back bank worked for you. I might try that next time. How many miles did you have on your Lumina when you did your belt? I see you have 92k on it now. It's really cool to see original owners on here!

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