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Mstg007

Storing Convertible Outside During Winter

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Any tips for storing the convertible outside during winter? I am not planning to drive it as a daily driver. Tarp on top cover or just let it run for awhile once a week... Usually the car is in the garage, but we are moving and boxes are now in the garage. FUN!

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I second the vote for a nice cover instead of a tarp, I think a cover with a soft lining will do less friction damage compared to a tarp.   Also, I've found that the elastic bottom edge of a cheap cover isn't enough to keep a cover on in a strong wind, so you would need some additional anchors or straps underneath the car.  

 

Do you ever get a lot of heavy wet snow?   I wouldn't want more than a couple inches of wet snow on top of the convertible, that's a lot of weight.  My convertible gets parked outside sometimes in the winter, and I brush off the snow if it gets more than a couple inches.   

 

As far as starting it, I also wouldn't bother.   Each cold start is hard on the car, might as well only have 1 in the Spring instead of 20 from all the weekly starts.   Concerning the battery, you could trickle charge it, or take it out of the car and put it in the garage, but those are both a lot of effort to just extend the battery life by a few dollars.     It also depends on where you live and how cold it is at night.   

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You guys are messing with my blood pressure! My 94 vert has been sitting all year under a cover in Africa, and I haven't thought about rats eating my new top, until you said something. I wonder what kind of scratches the cover itself has caused. Hopefully I'll be able to build a garage this December when I go down.post-9218-0-77223400-1510619219_thumb.jpg

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how about one of those $200 portable garages from harbor freight. You could get inside it any time to start it if you wanted, and the snow wouldnt be resting directly on it. I used one for a few years for my motorcycle and lawnmower...now its covering a couple of old tractors. dont forget the fabric sheets inside to keep the mice away

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FWIW, the covers are more for vanity than anything else. I keep my Z34 under a cover on the side of the street (because that's how it is living in the city) and the car will still get wet if it rains, it will still get critters under it (spider webs formed on the tail lights) and if you park it under a tree (I did for a couple weeks), the filth from the tree bark and the leaves will seep through the cover onto the body. I have to wash my Z34 but that means buying a hose and hoping no dumbass turned the water supply off in the complex I live in.

 

I've used a half tarp on my Cutlass to keep water out. My roof leaks. It hasn't messed with the paint, but the tie rope I use to tie it to the wheels did. 

 

Honestly, I would suggest a tarp that covers the roof and the areas around the windows, since our verts are prone to leaking and a well tied "cloth" cover - just be prepared to have to clean it, which you should at least every couple of months. 

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how about one of those $200 portable garages from harbor freight. You could get inside it any time to start it if you wanted, and the snow wouldnt be resting directly on it. I used one for a few years for my motorcycle and lawnmower...now its covering a couple of old tractors. dont forget the fabric sheets inside to keep the mice away

 

I have been thinking about buying one of those. So I can store a couple of mowers under for the winter. 

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I've got a bunch of experience with this. I've stored in the past several 1994 Supremes outside all winter, both a convertible and a hard top. Several key items are I'm a firm believer in the California Car Covers, nothing comes close to how well they breath and wick out any moisture that gets in. Go for either the Noah or the Storm-weave. DO NOT get the Supreme-weave as while that will keep ALL moisture out, it is too thin and will get whipped around in the wind. I made that mistake one year and I ruined my paint, the seams in the cover scratched the living snot out of it, especially the outer edges. In fact, I have a Noah all ready to go for my white 1996 and for this year I invested in 2 Gust Gards for the front and back. I'm really intent on tapping that cover down so it does not blow in the wind. Also, tie down the middle with the line they give you for free. The Storm-Weave is a heavier gauge than the Noah and it's also cheaper. I think in the winter the heavier the better as it has a better chance of staying put and that's key.

 

As already mentioned, don't let too much snow pile up on the convertible top, too much weight and then the stuff just melts and gets even heavier and becomes even more problematic. Be really careful brushing the snow off though, I recommend not using a snow brush with the ice scraper at the end, they are hard to control and that sharp edge will cut right into your cover, even a brand new one. Trust me on that one.

 

Regarding starting the cars, I used to start 'em up at least once every 3 weeks but I'm just going to let my 1996 sit all winter. Once the cover gets snow on it, that's it till 2018.

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