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DiscoStudd

3.6 LFX Oil Catch Can installation

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It's definitely condensation.  The coolant level is spot-on and the oil is nice and coolant-free.  No yogurt on the bottom of the 710 cap either!

Knock on wood, but damn, it would be a hellacious nightmare if a headgasket were to pop on that 3.6!

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What problem does that catch-can solve?

Without it, that condensation + traces of hydrocarbon goes harmlessly through the engine and out the tailpipe, just as it does on millions of other engines.

I didn't watch the entire video--I gave 'em both the "5-second fast-forward" over and over, so 15 minutes of video cost me about two minutes of my life.

Oxidizing hydrocarbons (burnt fuel) results in a shipload of water.  Hydrogen + Oxygen = what?

It's no surprise that water vapor collects in the crankcase as the result of blowby.  Everyone else uses a simple PCV system to eliminate it, you've added complexity and expense plus another maintenance item where it's not needed and does no good.

Edited by Schurkey

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Do a Google search for carbon buildup on GDI engines.  Also lookup "Alloytec Carbon Buildup."  BMW, VW, Ford, Toyota, GM, and Mopar, have all experienced carbon buildup on their early direct injection engines (Ecoboosts and Pentastars are the worst offenders.)  The LFX in my car isn't as notorious as the older LLT's in the Camaro and Traverse were for carbon buildup, but search any Camaro forum and there are pages upon pages of boroscopic proof of the GDI carbon buildup on the V6's.

As much as I despise Toyota, they came up with the best solution with their GDI engines.  They started putting port injectors in their GDI engines to wash the deposits off of the intake valves.

Your old pushrod, port-injected GM V6 will never have this problem, nor have any need for a catch can...

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Further education on the topic:

 

 

 

I understand how you'd not be informed of this issue, as I thought I was the last person on earth who was clinging desperately to his pushrod-powered GM vehicles well past the time the rest of the world moved onto OHC engines with DI.  I didn't really hear of this issue myself until after I purchased 2 GDI powered vehicles.  

 

Like I mentioned in my video, when the weather turns warm up here in the frozen tundra, I will be pulling my upper intake and running a scope down the intake ports to see how bad the carbon buildup is.  I hope I won't need to resort to walnut shell blasting, so I will try my damnest to clean the deposits out with a brush set and a thorough soaking of B12 Chemtool.

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Fine.  I'll ask again:

How does removing water condensation from the PCV system have any effect on carbon buildup in the intake system? The little amount of sludgy hydrocarbon you've trapped in the catch-can is so minor that it wouldn't have any noticeable effect on the valve deposits.

Far as I know, the carbon buildup on the valves and intake tract is from reversion, and from the EGR system, if used...not the PCV system.

I still say this is a total waste of effort.

Edited by Schurkey

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If one wants to stave off the carbon buildup on the backside of the the valves change your engine oil more often, if you're relying on that silly oil life monitor then do not. Regardless if using mineral based or synthetic keep the oil cleaner, that will reduce the buildup, it will not eliminate the problem but will help lessen it.

 

or like me....don't purchase any vehicle that makes use of a GDI engine, until this issue has been eliminated entirely.

I personally don't relish the idea of pulling my intake system every 40,000kms (not miles)  just to clean valves.

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