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Monoleaf Pad Thread (Part Number and HowTo Inside)

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went to my buddies shop the other day and he was completely baffled by them. he even swapped out a monoleaf for me in the past so he knows how to do it. I never have done one so I don't know. he was like "look there is no way! wanna try?" because I was like its easy, just pound it in with a hammer. thats what everyone is doing, takes like 10 minutes. He just laughed and I said never mind and left.

 

Oh well, I think I am just going to get some kyb gr2 struts and install my birchmount 2" drop steel spring all at the same time.

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went to my buddies shop the other day and he was completely baffled by them. he even swapped out a monoleaf for me in the past so he knows how to do it. I never have done one so I don't know. he was like "look there is no way! wanna try?" because I was like its easy, just pound it in with a hammer. thats what everyone is doing, takes like 10 minutes. He just laughed and I said never mind and left.

 

Oh well, I think I am just going to get some kyb gr2 struts and install my birchmount 2" drop steel spring all at the same time.

 

That's what I'm saying... I had to remove the monoleaf spring, and chisel off EVERY trace of the old rubber end mount before those pucks even came close to sliding in... Even after all that, I think I had to lightly grind some of the puck material off before it sat in the knuckle correctly.

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I acknowledge that this is an old thread, but the title is perfect for future searches...and it's how "I" found it.

 

Thought I'd show you how I installed the aftermarket nylon pads. Took two hours to stare into space "inventing" the tool, actually fabricating the tool, and driving to the hardware store for fully-threaded bolts. Took about ten minutes per side to actually install the plastic pads once I had the vehicle ('93 Lumina) lifted up with the wheels hanging free.

 

The first set of nylon pads I looked at were absolutely destroyed when we opened the package at the local NAPA. Someone had tried to install them, brutalized them beyond belief and then PUT THEM BACK IN THE BOX AND RETURNED THEM TO THE STORE. If you're a Total Moron and live in the Seasonally Frozen Wastelands, you're probably my down-the-street neighbor. Good thing my local NAPA had two sets in stock. I left with the second set.

 

Spring compressor tool requires:

24" of channel steel, cut 10" (two pieces) and the remainder is 4". Ten inches is a bit longer than absolutely needed; but the extra length doesn't interfere--and maybe makes this tool useful on some other vehicle.

Four 1/2-13 nuts. All nuts are welded to channel steel, but the nut on the smallest piece has the threads removed by running the 1/2" drill bit through it before welding it to the channel--it just pops over the end of the bolt but does not thread onto it. That nut just prevents the small piece from sliding out of position.

Two 1/2-13 X 6" bolts

One 1/2-13 X 3" bolt The short bolt pictured can be cut down, it is inconveniently long.

 

One ~1/8 drill bit to make pilot holes for the 1/2 drill bit

One 1/2" drill bit to make 5 holes and remove the threads from one nut

3/8" or 1/4" drill motor for pilot bit

1/2" drill motor for 1/2 drill bit

Weld nuts to channel as shown. With all threaded nuts on top of the channel, the welds are not critical--just keeps 'em from turning; or from getting lost when the tool is rattling around in the tool box.

The heat of welding slightly distorted the nuts, I ran a 1/2-13 tap through the three nuts with threads.

 

Spring compressor painted and pretty. [EDIT--note that I have changed the bolts, the end ones are not threaded all the way]

W-Spring01.jpg

 

 

Compressor installed on right side. Center screw jacks up spring.

W-Spring02.jpg

 

 

Have to be careful to NOT jack spring up so high that it jams the end of the spring against the bottom of the strut housing. I can imagine spring damage if it's forced up too high.

W-Spring03.jpg

 

 

I cleaned out all the gravel and loose rust; and knocked loose rubber from the original spring pad off of the spring.

W-Spring04.jpg

 

 

New spring pad taps in pretty easily. Does not quite push in by hand.

W-Spring05.jpg

 

 

See how the lips on the bottom of the pad hug the hub carrier?

W-Spring13.jpg

 

The compressor in place after the pad is installed. I painted a thin film of grease on the spring and pad contact surfaces, but I don't think that's critical--and may just be a trap for road grit. Nothing left to do on this side but to unscrew three bolts and remove tool.

W-Spring06.jpg

 

 

Markings on the aftermarket pad. No, it's not made BY Moog, but it may come packaged in a Moog or NAPA or Advance Auto or CarQuest box. Smooth side goes against spring, ribbed side goes down.

W-Spring07.jpg

 

W-Spring08.jpg

 

 

The original equipment rubber pad--slightly worn.

W-Spring09.jpg

 

W-Spring10.jpg

 

 

And the OEM rubber pad as you might find it on your vehicle--partially separated from the spring. I used the hammer and a long pry-bar as a chisel to remove the pad. Use caution, you do NOT want to gouge the spring in the process of separating it from the rubber pad.

W-Spring11.jpg

 

W-Spring12.jpg

Edited by Schurkey

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Wow! That's some great information. Someone from the site should make a PDF of that post and put it into Tech Info.

 

Schurkey: Maybe you would consider Renting out that tool. I know it seems easy enough to make, but many people won't have that option available. If you could rent it for like $15-20 shipped to the renter, then the renter pays to ship it back, you would probably help out a lot of people. If not, PM me if you want to sell it, and I might...

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Wow! That's some great information.

[Elvis Voice]Thankyew, thankyew verra much. [/Elvis Voice]

 

Schurkey: Maybe you would consider Renting out that tool. I know it seems easy enough to make, but many people won't have that option available. If you could rent it for like $15-20 shipped to the renter, then the renter pays to ship it back, you would probably help out a lot of people. If not, PM me if you want to sell it, and I might...

$20 rental plus return shipping? Gonna be nearly a $30 deal.

 

I'll have my second car fitted with the spring pads tomorrow or Tuesday; I guess the spring compressor will be "available" after that. I need to check with the Post Office because I think shipping cost is a make-or-break deal on this. If this can ship in the ~$6 priority mail envelope, things are looking up. If it's gonna take a ~$11 box, I think there's no way folks will pay that much.

 

On the other hand, if I make a few changes to help cut costs--and the Post Office is agreeable--I could conceivably SELL these things for ~$35 including shipping. Specifically, I need to find out if "ordinary" bolts will work instead of the fully-threaded bolts, and I need to be flexible with the design (potentially substituting bar stock or angle stock for the channel steel; I built the thing using a leftover "scrap" piece of metal...and next time it may be a two-foot section of bar stock instead of channel. The advantage to selling it outright is that there's no return shipping fee.

 

Personally, I don't think there's going to be too much interest...but I've been wrong before.

 

I'll update when I get shipping cost and have had a chance to try the different bolts.

Edited by Schurkey

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Finished the second Lumina today. Actually had MORE problems with it than the first one. I think I've figured out why some folks have to beat the living crap out of the nylon pads to get 'em to snap into place.

 

The end of the leaf spring may not be centered on the iron casting; and it becomes trapped in place by the hub carrier. There is no room for it to move upward so the pad can slide in. I poked a tapered pry-bar between the spring and the rear lateral arm; I don't know if I moved the spring or the hub carrier--but--with the spring out from under the edge of the iron casting, the nylon block snaps in MUCH more easily!

 

This is the tip of the spring, catching on the iron casting. See how it isn't centered in the casting--too far to the rear.

W-Spring14.jpg

 

The spring compressor works just fine with the shorter bolts. It will fit into a USPS Priority Mail envelope. PM me for payment details; the first person who actually sends money BUYS THIS SPRING COMPRESSOR FOR $35 delivered to any USPS address in the USA.

 

The SECOND and THIRD people who send money get a slightly modified version in that the channel iron will be just a little smaller, so as to ship more easily. Just as functional; but a bit more compact.

 

The fourth person will be advised as to exact construction; as stated above "the design may change based on available materials".

Edited by Schurkey

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I'm grateful for this write-up!!!  The creaking coming from my rear suspension had been driving me crazy!  My car only has 52,000 miles on it, but the pad was completely gone on one side and barely there on the other.  I bought the hard white pads from Napa... and unfortunately It does seem like it raised the car up more in the rear than before.  

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So I read this thread and was worried about my pads on the International.  I took these pics but not sure what to look for.  The rubber looks good but do I need to check anything else?  Car doesn't run right now so I don't know if the suspension squeaks or feels mushy.

Driver side.

83o3Ia.jpg

Passenger side.

cKcEVK.jpg

I'm learning so much right now about these cars and I want to keep it going!

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Anyone experienced a fiberglass leaf spring failure with the spring pads installed?  Or ever had to actually replace them?  

I think some people were previously concerned that there would be some excess wear of the spring ends when they're installed.

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On 12/5/2018 at 3:07 AM, pitzel said:

Anyone experienced a fiberglass leaf spring failure with the spring pads installed?  Or ever had to actually replace them?  

I think some people were previously concerned that there would be some excess wear of the spring ends when they're installed.

I've thought about the design of these plastic blocks in the years since I installed them on my two Ws.

I believe the intent with these is NOT to replace the rubber pads, they're simply a spacer to add some ride-height to the ass-end of the car.  As such, the spring should have fresh rubber pads glued into place BEFORE installing the plastic blocks.

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WAAAAAAY back I replaced the rubber pads... Back then most things were Dealer Items... Got the Pads from my Parts Manager/Friend at the local dealer, it came as a kit... It had some kind of Real Strong epoxy,,, 2 parts I believe... Back then there were NO plastic blocks,,, to my knowledge anyway... Using it as a spacer sounds good tho... I have NEVER heard that before... Then again,,, I have NO experience with the blocks or known of anyone who used them,,, other than what I read on forums,,, 60*v6 for many years and now here..

Tom B...

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